Saturday, January 12, 2013

Download CMMI+Scrum Article from the Cutter IT Journal!

Dear Readers,

Last month my article in, "CMMI vs. Scrum?  NO!  CMMI + Scrum!" was published in the Cutter IT Journal.  It is now available for download to YOU, our loyal readers!

In this article, Jeff Dalton walks us through a fairly thorough application of CMMI in Scrum settings. He further demonstrates an approach to CMMI that is not only compatible with Scrum, but also uses Scrum and agile thinking to facilitate CMMI! It's not merely a matter of such-and-so Scrum practices demonstrating this-or-that CMMI practice -- that would be both easy and disingenuous. Dalton practices what he preaches and would never lead a company down a path that only solves their performance needs once, leaving them with nothing with which to fend for themselves when circumstances change. Instead, he offers us a delightfully simple and robust architecture that we can use to build processes incrementally and iteratively. How agile!

Click on the cover below to download your free copy of this CMMI and Scrum article today - and thank you for reading "Ask the CMMI Appraiser!"

CMMI, CMMI Certification, CMMI Training, CMMI Class, CMMI Consulting, Software Process Improvement, CMMI Level 2, CMMI Level 3












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Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead AppraiserCertified CMMI Instructor, author, and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI trainings and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategyperformance innovation , software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

5 comments:

Himanshu Karkhanis said...

Dear Jeff,

I didnt actually read the entire PDF yet, just kind of floated over all the pages but still....lo and behold! I was already 50% sure that I could win the "C v/s S" battle back at home, just by looking at the way the content has been arranged by you. I wonder how much equipped I would be once I actually went through it completely! Thank you Jeff!! (P.S. Allow me to post this link in my company blog which is dedicated to process quality, I am sure my folks would appreciate a lot)

Himanshu Karkhanis said...

Dear Jeff,

I didnt actually read the entire PDF yet, just kind of floated over all the pages but still....lo and behold! I was already 50% sure that I could win the "C v/s S" battle back at home, just by looking at the way the content has been arranged by you. I wonder how much equipped I would be once I actually went through it completely! Thank you Jeff!! (P.S. Allow me to post this link in my company blog which is dedicated to process quality, I am sure my folks would appreciate a lot)

Jeff Dalton said...

Himanshu,

Thank you for your comments. It's amazing how many people have responded to my CMMI and Scrum article. I'm glad that it was helpful to you, and you are welcomed to post the link on your company blog.

Good luck with your CMMI and Scrum "battle" at home!

Jeff

Himanshu Karkhanis said...

Dear Jeff,

You write in our article that CMMI can improve Agile. TRUE. I believe, however, even the opposite is true - Agile can make CMMI create sense out of things.

Most of the issues faced by CMMI "implementers" is the rigid and "rule-book" approach followed by them, which ultimately leads them to produce (1) a project plan which is useless (because the original plan seems to have gone far away), (2) a WBS which is way offtrack (because no one bothered to change the expected timelines against an observed early deviation), or (3) a set of documents which do not seem to reflect the way a project was actually delivered.

An agile approach teaches them to have a far-sighted approach while creating project plans; it tells them that estimations are not single-values but rather a range of expected values; and it creates a beautiful combination of multiple-version document each having its own history label.

An ounce of Agile with a glass of CMMI would be the perfect medicine for an ailing process...

Jeff Dalton said...

Himanshu,

Yes! You're right on!

The first trick is to understand that CMMI isn't something you "implement." It's about how you do work. We use Scrum to design and deploy new processes. We also believe that "purity is evil" and that it's OK to combine elements of agile with elements of waterfall - what works for you is the ONLY important thing! Thanks again for following my CMMI and Agile Blog - and for posting my article on your blog. Jeff