Wednesday, May 23, 2018

Is there a video that gives an overview of CMMI 2.0?

Hey, CMMI Appraiser,

I was looking for an overview of CMMI V2.0 on video.  Can you recommend something about CMMI 2.0 on Youtube? Thanks. ~ Scott B.

Hey, Scott! The best place to go for videos on CMMI 2.0 is CMMI-TV, our YouTube channel.

Check out my series of videos highlighting all of the CMMI V2.0 model on CMMI-TV:



If you are interested in learning more about using CMMI V2.0 to improve the performance, or just to get a rating for your company in this new model, we offer classes in both CMMI and Agile.  Go to cmmi2training.com for more information.

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software leader!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Moving from Retrospectives to Continuous Improvement

[Readers - we've been writing about the new version of CMMI lately, but today I'm happy to introduce our first guest blogger in a while, Leon Tranter.  Leon is an agilist and blogger from Sydney, South New Wales.  You can follow him on Twitter at: @LeonTranterEU.  Welcome Leon! ]


Moving from Retrospectives to Continuous Improvement


Retrospectives are one of the core ceremonies in Scrum, and considered an
essential part of Agile software development. They are even called out specifically
in the Agile Manifesto: At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more
effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

This regular "pause and reflect" activity seems to connect the Lean Manufacturing
idea of Kaizen or Continuous Improvement to the short time-frame iterative nature of
Agile software development.


Many people conclude from this that by performing Retrospectives, a team is thereby
doing Continuous Improvement. However, I would argue that this is not the case,
and that Retrospectives are in some way a move away from the Lean concept of Kaizen.


The main problem with Sprint Retrospectives is that they are by their nature done
every sprint (which is usually a two week iteration). This means that issues that come up
during the sprint have to wait up to two weeks before they are brought up at a retrospective.
This can make it hard for people to accurately remember the details of the issues, since
they are now dislocated from that incident spatially and temporally.


This also means that problems can go uninvestigated or unresolved for one or two weeks
during a sprint, further eroding the team’s effectiveness. A once per sprint event is not
“continuous”, it is in fact discrete - the opposite of continuous!

The true spirit of Continuous Improvement, from Lean Manufacturing, is that
improvement is something that is the responsibility of everyone in the company - not just
software developers everybody, from accountants all the way to the CEO. It is also something
that happens all the time - continuously.


When a problem happens, or someone notices a tool or process that is inefficient or not fit f
or purpose, they must stop what they are doing and call attention to it. And the organisation
must treat this seriously and resolve to fix it, ideally then and there.


As an example, Toyota car factories have something called “Andon Cords”, which are
cables hung from the ceiling over an assembly line. If a worker notices a problem, they pull the
cord - the entire manufacturing line comes to a halt and those in the area huddle around to
investigate and resolve the issue.


This behaviour is a true reflection of the meaning of Continuous Improvement, an idea
some call “Stop and Fix It”. This requires a significant change in the mindset and
behaviour of the organisation, which is usually focused on day to day operations, and
deferring non-urgent problems for another day. Retrospectives were designed with good
intentions but fit too easily into this mold. Moving to a true Kaizen organisation is a larger
shift but with potentially huge payoffs for those that can make the transition.

Leon writes about Agile and Lean at his blog www.extremeuncertainty.com. Why don't you check it out right now?

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software leader!


Jeff Dalton is Chief Evangelist at AgileCxO.org, and a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the Agile and CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in Scrum Master, Product Owner, and CMMI training classes, and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful Agile Transformation or CMMI program.



Sunday, March 25, 2018

Timeline for the release of CMMI v2.0 Components

Editor's Note: This is fifth in our series about the upcoming release of CMMI v2.0 [Jeff] -- updated.

CMMI v2.0 is HERE!!!!

The first release of the latest version of the CMMI, last updated in 2010, happened on schedule at the end of March, and we couldn't be any more excited!  

But, there are lot of components to be released, and they won't all come out at once.  Here's what we know for now:



Initial v2.0 Release - March 28, 2018

The initial release of the new model focuses, for now, only on the "Development View" (the closest thing to a "View," a new keyword in v2.0, is the entity formerly known as a "constellation").

The entire model related to Development has been released, along with a new online navigator - a database-driven tool that will allow users to login, surf the model, and look at it from different perspectives (Maturity Level, Practice Area, etc). 

They released the initial training for this View - a two day class called "Foundations in Capability" and a one-day class called "Building DEV Excellence."  This is roughly equivalent to today's "Introduction to CMMI" class, but will include a certification exam.  Successful completion of the exam is a prerequisite (among others) for serving on an Appraisal Team.

We're teaching Washington, DC's very first CMMI v2.0 class on May 7-9, along with our famous CMMI-Agile Integration Workshop on the 10th and 11th.  You can find more information about registering for both classes here.

Mid-Year 2018

A new version of the appraisal process AND appraisal system (the dreaded "SAS"), will be released.  I'll cover the new appraisal method in another post, but hold on - it's different!

January 1, 2019

New v2.0 Benchmarking appraisals (formerly called SCAMPI A appraisals) based on CMMI v2.0 will be accepted by the CMMI Institute.  So, if you plan on adopting CMMI in the next year, this will be available to you....BUT....

March 2020 (tentative): 

CMMI v1.3 appraisals will no longer be accepted and CMMI v1.3 will be sunset.

2019 - TBA

Release of the Services View, and potentially, a Cyber-Security View.  So stay tuned! 

A Lot of Changes Coming - But Not All at Once!

If you've been reading the blog, you know there are lot of changes coming.  But all of the fanfare for March 28 is only for the initial release of the new model, and a set of training classes.  Sure - it'll be awesome, but there is SO Much more to come!

There are quite a few other changes – including the new sampling rules, and more.  I'll be back in a couple of days to write about those.

Meantime, if you're interested in learning more about the set of in-depth classes we are offering on the subject in May, click "CMMI v2.0 Training."

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

CMMI v2.0: What is going on with the Constellations DEV, SVC, and ACQ?

Editor's Note: This is fourth in our series about the upcoming release of CMMI v2.0 [Jeff]

A lot of people have been asking, "What's happening with the Constellations?" Short answer - they're gone for CMMI v2.0!




Yes, that's right.  In v1.3 of the CMMI, there are 3.5 flavors, or constellations. What?  3.5?  Yes - that's right.  There are three "official" version of CMMI, known today as CMMI-DEV, for engineering, software, and other product development organizations, there is CMMI-SVC for those companies delivering pure services (staff augmentation, call centers, data centers, etc), and CMMI-ACQ for those organizations that "acquire" all of their products and services.  The .5 is People-CMM, or P-CMM, which isn't official CMM"I", yet, but is sometimes included in the set of constellations (but not officially) when people talk about CMMI.

All of this is going away in v2.0, to be replaced by "views."  This is exactly what it sounds like.  The new CMMI v2.0 will be a table-driven RDMS product (no book!), that will leave the door open for both real-time and long-term enhancements and changes without the need to re-artchitect the model and come out with a new book.

It will ALSO leave the door open for "build your own model," although that will not be part of the initial release in v2.0

In fact, the "initial" release on March 31 will only include what we know today as DEV, now called "CMMI Development."  The next release, date unknown, is said to be what we know today as SVC, now called "CMMI Services."  There is rumor of a really exciting cyber security model being added after that, but nothing has been officially announced. 

So, if you're familiar with the concept of "views" of a relational database, you'll see what they did. They've opened up the model for different views (queries), and they've predefined the first one for us and they're calling it "CMMI Development."  Who knows where this will lead?  But it reminds me of "Build a Bear Workshop."  Lots of potential!

We'll explore all of that in DC's first CMMI v2.0 training class here: CMMI v2.0 Training.

Overall, the approach seems solid.  An online tool is long overdue and will make moving about the model easier, as well as open it up for potential tool developers. I'm disappointed that they are not planning a book, though.  A big part of the new CMMI training will be teaching people how to use a database tool, and having them stare at the tool during class, and probably checking their email and doing work while they're at it.  That's what my experience teaching the class 129 times is - laptops are distracting, but the books gets them focused! We'll make it work though.

There are quite a few other changes.  I'll be back in a couple of days to write about more!

In the meantime, if you're interested in learning more about the set of in-depth classes we are offering on the subject May 7-9, click "CMMI v2.0 Training."

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Thursday, March 1, 2018

FINALLY!!! CMMI v2.0 addresses leadership and governance!

Editor's Note: This is third in our series about the upcoming release of CMMI v2.0 [Jeff]

FINALLY!!! CMMI v2.0 addresses leadership and governance!



"It's like pushing a rope uphill."

"My management only wants the CMMI certification."

"I care about the improvement, sure, but I really need the cert (wink wink)."

We've all heard it.  The CMMI, a performance model designed to help organizations improve, is often left in the hands of low-ranking, non-influential employees without authority to make change happen - and get little attention from senior management.

CMMI v2.0 is going to try to change that.

The new version, scheduled to be released on March 31, 2018, includes new Practice Areas (name change) for leadership.

Governance (GOV)

Governance will provide guidance and "appraise-able" practices for leadership, focusing on their efforts to improve performance.  That includes setting objectives (wow - seems obvious, yet...), prioritizing improvements, ensuring competencies, identifying Goals/Questions/Metrics needed to measure success, and providing the resources needed for improving performance.

Process Management (PCM)

Process management will provide guidance on developing a process performance architecture (again...seems obvious, but few do it because it's not specifically in the current model), keeping needs and objectives current, aligning improvements with objectives, implements, deploying, and sustaining, improvements, and more.

Not everything needed to improve performance is contained in GOV and PCM, but there will be a appraisal deliverable, a performance report, that will track improvements over time and be part of any re-appraisal. In other words....you need to at least TRY to improve.  Not just perform.

The Bottom Line

The inclusion of specific practices (see what I did there...) related to leadership, architecture, and actual improvement will go a long way to wake up absent leaders who think the CMMI is another plaque on the wall (we call that "Plaque Buildup") that is something they need to worry about every three years.  Oh yea...renewal period....we'll talk about that in another post!

There are quite a few other changes – including simplifying the model, reducing the cost, and more.  I'll be back in a couple of days to write about those.

Meantime, if you're interested in learning more about the set of in-depth classes we are offering on the subject in May, click "CMMI v2.0 Training."

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Thursday, February 22, 2018

Bon voyage, sweet Generics, we hardly knew ya!

Editor's Note: This is second in our series about the upcoming release of CMMI v2.0 [Jeff]

Thirteen practices, eighteen process areas, and a whole lot of discovery goin' on! We've all just gotten used to it - now you can say goodbye to the Generic Practices....FOREVER!**




The CMMI's Generic Practices (GPs), the set of 13 practices that serve as the "secret sauce" for ensuring institutionalization and adoption across all of the process areas, have been part of the CMMI since the beginning. 

As I've taught in 100+ CMMI training classes, they are the definition of "goodness" for successful process implementation.

Currently, users of the CMMI model apply the following Generic Practices to every process thread:

GP1.1: Perform Specific Practices (show up, do your work, duh)

GP2.1: Establish an Organizational Policy (ensure everyone understands what is expected of them)

GP2.2: Plan the Process (plan out how the process will be executed, so everyone knows)

GP2.3 Provide Resources (make sure all the tools, funding, and other resources are provided to be successful)

GP2.4: Assign Responsibility (assign process roles, not job titles)

GP2.5: Train People: (yeah, yeah, yeah, no one does this...enough)

GP2.6: Control Work Products (don't be a jerk, save your work)

GP2.7: Identify and Involve Relevant Stakeholders (are people playing their process roles?)

GP2.8: Monitor and Control the Process (is it working as planned?)

GP2.9: Objectively Evaluate Adherance (are people using the process?)

GP2.10: Review Status with Higher Level Management (making sure they care)

GP3.1: Establish a Defined Process (the project gets to tailor the process)

GP3.2 Collect Process Related Experiences (long way of saying lessons-learned, metrics, retros)

I've long said that the GPs are the best part of the CMMI, and they are what really differentiates it from other models.  And they're going away.

In CMMI v2.0 there will be more Practice Areas [heads up: name change in v2.0]  focused on the process, and two of them, Implementation Infrastructure (II) and Governance (GOV), will serve a similar function to the GPs.  We'll do a direct mapping in a later post, but for now, the practice areas include:

Implementation Infrastructure (II)

II will include practices for performing the process, providing resources, training, using organizational assets, and collecting lessons and assets.  Sound familiar?

Governance (GOV)

GOV covers more ground than the Generic Practices, but it also includes setting of policies and expectations, providing resources for continuous improvement, and adhering to policies.

So, yeah, the Generic Practices.

It's my understanding that both II and GOV will need to be applied to ALL Practice Areas in scope for an appraisal, and the "level" of each must match the target maturity level (think "Continuous Representation" and you'll get the idea).  Of course - some of this might change prior to release on March 31, but this seems pretty well baked.  So, at least they've kept the functionality.

So, the days of using the Generic Practices as a handy "front-of-book, back-of-the-book" reference are over, and you'll no longer have them to kick around during appraisals.  But now we'll have II and GOV to look forward to - so onward!

There are quite a few other changes – including how CMMI Training has changed (next week), and more.  I'll be back in a couple of days to write about those.

Meantime, if you're interested in learning more about the set of in-depth classes we are offering on the subject in May, click "CMMI v2.0 Training."

** all of this could change before the release on March 31, although I doubt it will.

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

Doin' the SCAMPI Shuffle: Hello Benchmarking!

Editor's Note: This is first in our series about the upcoming release of CMMI v2.0 [Jeff]

Doin' the SCAMPI Shuffle!

What happens to SCAMPI in CMMI v2.0?


CMMI v1.3

If you're a follower of my blog, you know (and love) SCAMPI - the "Standard CMMI Method for Process Improvement," the globally adored standard method for conducting CMMI Appraisals resulting in a Maturity Level (or Capability Level) rating (ex. "ML4").

Actually, there are three different flavors of SCAMPI.  The best known is the SCAMPI A, or "Class A" appraisal.  This is the most rigorous appraisal, has a high evidence requirement, and is the only appraisal that can result in a Maturity Level Rating.

The other two are:

  • Class B, a less rigorous cousin of "A's" that is often used as a Readiness Appraisal or "system test" prior to conducting a Class A.
  • Class C, which is often used as an early gap analysis tool.  Both have their place, but don't result in a maturity level.

The entire objective of a SCAMPI appraisal, regardless of type, is to evaluate the process improvement infrastructure that an organization has deployed, and to identify, using evidence-based methods, opportunities for improvement.  As they say, "SCAMPI without Process Improvement is a SCAM."  Or something.

At some point, our friends in the government (followed by many commercial enterprises) started to require a successful SCAMPI A ("get a level") as part of their selection process, and that put the industry on a trajectory towards growing the number (and cost) of SCAMPI A Appraisals.

In fact, cost, primarily the internal kind, has become the #1 impediment to companies adopting CMMI, and since they don't adopt it, they often can't bid. See the problem?  Thanks, government.

Enter CMMI v2.0

Join us for CMMI v2.0 Training!

CMMI v2.0 is an entirely new, downsized, and improved model along with a shiny new (yet to be named) appraisal methodology.  All we know now about the name is that it won't be named "SCAMPI."

Instead of a SCAMPI A there'll be a "Benchmarking" appraisal.  That appraisal, like a CMMI v1.3 appraisal, will have a shelf-life of three years.

Then comes the "Sustainment" appraisal.  If the organization hasn't changed much, and they conduct one of there babies prior to expiration, they get to conduct a smaller, more efficient appraisal that is good for TWO years.  This is similar in concept to the ill-fated "SCAMPI-E" that never really got much traction in v1.3.

After that, we have the "Evaluation" appraisal.  This is similar to a Class C, or even a Class B, in that it doesn't result in a maturity level, but is open to tailoring, unlike the Benchmarking appraisal.

There are quite a few other changes - including how the sample will be generated, requirements of appraisal team members, and more.  I'll be back in a couple of days to write about those.

Meantime, if you're interested in learning more about the set of in-depth classes we are offering on the subject in May, click "CMMI v2.0 Training."

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Is CMMI still popular?

Hey, CMMI Appraiser – We've been discussing adopting a process model to help guide us while improving our software development organization's performance. Is the CMMI still popular among large organizations, and would this be the best framework for what we are trying to do? ~ Sanjam S.

Hey, Sanjam, thank you for your questions! The answer to both is “Yes!”

Yes, the CMMI is still extremely popular among companies of all sizes. CMMI adoption continues to expand, both in the USA and worldwide. Check out the new data released by the CMMI Institute:


The CMMI Institute's 2017 Annual Report to Partners analyzes the worldwide market to determine the adoption of the CMMI. As you can see, the 2,632 appraisals conducted in 2017 represents a new high water mark. Adoption continues to increase, 17% overall and 3% in the United States.

2017 was a great year for CMMI. More organizations than ever got CMMI appraisals, and satisfaction has strengthened with end-users giving CMMI a world-class Net Promoter Score of +44, up three points from 2013.

Another interesting statistic from the Report, as it pertains to your goal of becoming a Fortune 500 company:

The Report states that an examination of the recent list by Fortune magazine of the 500 largest companies in the world revealed that 34 Fortune 500 companies have received CMMI appraisals. In addition, 14 of the Top 50 Most Admired companies by Forbes have active CMMI appraisals.

Those 14 companies are: Microsoft, General Electric, Honeywell, IBM, Boeing, General Dynamics, Northrump Grummond, Lockheed Martin, Booz Allen Hamilton, McKesson, Raytheon, Cognizant, Aetna, and Insight.

To answer your second question, based on what you’ve shared here, yes, an evidence-based model like the CMMI is the best framework for what you are trying to do.  It's both broad and deep, and assuming you don't over-do it, it should fit your need quite nicely.

I appreciate your comment that you are considering achieving a CMMI Maturity Level in the spirit of trying to do the right things to improve. It’s also useful to keep in mind that this discussion is also about risk management. The way you do things – the way you drive software process improvement in your firm, for example – is in itself, a risk-avoidance technique. You can keep items off your risk list by learning to adopt an evidence-based model like the CMMI to guide the behaviors of the people who are doing the work.

Going forward, I would say that the adoption of CMMI by organizations like yours is the trajectory the industry is on. It’s all part of a widespread movement by companies large and small in North America to put themselves on the path to greatness and compete in the global market.

The CMMI supports your intention to do things the right way by keeping you focused on the right behaviors. Not only will you achieve CMMI Level 2 or CMMI Level 3 (the most common CMMI maturity levels) as a natural result … not only will you drive the software process improvement results you are looking for … but you’ll be on the path to greatness, whether you ultimately make the Fortune 500 list or not.

Now that’s what I call doing things the right way!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

CMMI V2.0 is coming! Are you ready?

Dear, CMMI Appraiser, I just found out that an all new version of CMMI coming out soon. We were recently re-appraised for CMMI-DEV v1.3, and we heard nothing about this at the time. What secret changes are coming for me and my company? ~ Jay H.

Dear Jay,

I understand that the CMMI 2.0 news may have caught you by surprise -- but don't let it throw you off your game. In CMMI, as in life, there is really only one real secret: Change happens.



To help you learn about CMMI 2.0, I will be writing about it this month, and also will be leading one of the first public CMMI 2.0 Training Classes, on May 7-9, 2018, in Washington, D.C. You are personally invited to attend.

There is a lot to learn - new language, new practices, and a brand new appraisal methodology.

Click here to learn about registering for “CMMI v2.0 Training” 

A ton of value is packed into this class (actually, it's two classes - Foundations of Capability + Building DEV Excellence). Since you're already thinking about your next appraisal, you'll appreciate knowing that the this class will take you inside the changing Appraisal process. You will be introduced to the new concepts in the latest release of the new CMMI model, and you will see how these changes impact the way CMMI Appraisals are conducted.

Here's a preview:  SCAMPI is going away!  So are Specific Goals....

But you don't have to wait until May to start learning about CMMI 2.0. Over the coming weeks, we'll explore the nuances of the changing CMMI model and appraisal method right here. So stop back soon -- and bring a friend!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified CMMI v2.0 Lead Appraiser and Instructor, as well as a CMMI v1.3 SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. 

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

A Whole Lotta CMMI Going on for 2018!

Hey, CMMI Appraiser - we are a fast growing Detroit-based engineering supplier to the automotive industry with an agile approach to software development. We recently achieved a CMMI Level 2 and are looking for ways to get our new hires up to speed on using CMMI and Agile together as we grow. What are our options for early 2018? ~ Lucas L. 

Hey, Lucas,

Thanks for submitting your question. Broadsword is offering quite a few opportunities for your new teammates to learn about CMMI, Agile and organizational performance innovation. Below is a slate of upcoming Keynote presentations, training classes and webinars. Check them out!


WEBINARS:

December 15th @2PM – CMMI: Everything You Need to Know!
January 26th @2PM – CMMI: Everything You Need to Know!

TRAINING CLASS:

February 6-9, 2018 in Washington, DC area – Introduction to CMMI-DEV v1.3 with optional 1-day CMMI-SVC supplement

KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS:

March 19-20, 2018 in Boston, MA – ASQ BOSCON 2018 Conference
May 24, 2018 in San Antonio, TX – QUEST 2018

As an Agile shop that has become a CMMI-focused organization, Lucas, you will find that these Keynotes, training classes and webinars will give your new hires all the information they need to help address persistent problems, and improve upon what your company is ALREADY doing.

We hope to see your organization represented at one or more of these events!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

We need CMMI training FAST. Where can we find it in early 2018?

Dear CMMI Appraiser,

Several of us are going to be on a CMMI Appraisal Team, and we need to get up to speed with CMMI Training FAST, like, yesterday! Where can we get this training? We want something a little more than a "lecture." ~ Lou B.


Lou,

Wow, that’s quite a request! The only way to get to yesterday’s CMMI training class is to climb in to a Delorean.


Don't have one sitting in your driveway? Maybe I can help you get to a class in the future.

The "Introduction to CMMI" course is an excellent course for anyone who is tasked with, or interested in, transforming their organization into a high-performing, lean, and productive team. Beginning with the WHY to use CMMI, then followed by the WHAT you need to do, and finally the HOW to do it, the Intro to CMMI class is a great place to begin for any project manager, engineer, software developer, line manager, analyst, tester, or process or quality professional.

Since you intend to participate in a SCAMPI Appraisal team, CMMI training is required. But while it may be too late to sign up for CMMI training class in 2017, you definitely have options for 2018. 

While you can always take a course at the CMMI Institute, but you might consider taking it from a CMMI Institute Partner, like Broadsword Solutions Corporation (www.broadswordsolutions.com). They'll fill in the gaps with stories, examples, exercises, and case studies as they go. It’s all based on their real-world experience. They even cover CMMI and Agile.

Broadsword just happens to be running one of these "Introduction to CMMI" Training classes February 6-9 in Fairfax, Virginia, just outside of Washington, DC. The first three days of this particular class are focused on CMMI-DEV. Also available is a one-day supplement on CMMI-SVC.

You can register at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/february-6-9-2018-introduction-to-cmmi-dev-training-woptional-svc-supplement-fairfax-va-tickets-38638711426

Good luck - and enjoy your class!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

What Is the SDCA and How Does It Help FCA Suppliers Win More Business?

Dear Jeff, we received a notice from Fiat Chrysler that an SDCA appraisal has been scheduled for us. As a new supplier to FCA, we know they use it to determine whether we will be a long term supplier, and we're excited about the opportunity. What is the SDCA, and how does it help us win more business? ~ Paul A.

Dear Paul,

Great questions! The Supplier Design Capability Appraisal (SDCA) is a engineering performance model that was established to provide an intuitive and flexible framework to be used for evaluating the engineering and project management capabilities of suppliers.


The goal of the SDCA is to determine if a supplier demonstrated high performance their work with Fiat Chrysler. From the suppliers’ perspective, the goal is much larger. The SDCA is a model for improving service and product delivery. By following its guidance, suppliers can put themselves on the path to becoming not just a better company, but a great company that earns the long-term business that FCA is able to provide them.

Here are three ways the SDCA can have a positive impact on your ability to win more business:

Reason #3: Marketing

There is no inherent value in having a high SDCA score. The real value comes from making it your goal to improve and change the way your entire organization behaves, so that you deliver a work product of greater value to the customer. As a by-product, you will be able to demonstrate a higher level of technical and process capability, which will become what you are known for, i.e., your “Way” of doing business, your brand.

Reason #2: Customer Mandates

FCA wants you to be a high performer for reasons that should inspire you to want to be better. They think the SDCA is important because it is important.

You seem to get this, Paul, but some suppliers really don’t yet. They call us and say, “What do I need to do to get a high score?”

I always respond by asking, “Is that really why you are doing this? I understand that you want to stay in your client’s good graces. But the SDCA is so much more valuable and useful than that. Let’s talk about things like how well you are running your operation, how well you are delivering, how happy your customer really is with your service and delivery.”

For anyone who is passionate about improvement, these kinds of questions will get your heart thumping. These are the kinds of things you WANT to be asking, because learning is your goal, not merely getting a high score, and because asking the right questions is what great companies do.

And that brings me to …

Reason #1: To Be a Great Company

I find that more and more organizations understand the value of process improvement and performance innovation. Suppliers are approaching the SDCA as one of the tools that can help them learn how to behave like a great company. And while they know it won’t be easy to do the work necessary to learn the behaviors and transform their culture, they willingly take on the challenge, knowing that the journey can be its own reward.

I appreciate your taking the time to send in your question, Paul. With a little context and creativity, the SDCA is a powerful solution for any supplier that plans, designs, and delivers any type of product or service for the FCA. As long as you focus on setting the right goals and objectives, and asking the right questions, you are going to be a great company, and your business will grow.

Good luck!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author, and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI trainings and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit http://my-broadswordsolutions.com for more information about running a successful SDCA program.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving, CMMI Style!

Dear friends,

This Thanksgiving, we are thankful for YOU! Your focus on using the CMMI and Agile to pursue organizational excellence has helped transform the industry and raise the standard for everyone.



Thank you for understanding that the CMMI is a journey, not a destination.

Thank you for continually learning to make your company better.

Thank you for setting goals and objectives in your organization.

Thank you for asking the right questions.

Thank you for choosing the CMMI to put your company on the path to greatness.

As a different kind of performance innovation firm, we’re thankful for the chance to help companies like yours use the CMM and Agile to get even better.. So whether you are traveling or staying local this holiday season, we wish you abundant health and happiness in your ongoing quest to be kind of organization you’ve always wanted to be.

From our family to yours - Happy Thanksgiving!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.


Tuesday, November 14, 2017

“Introduction to CMMI-DEV” Class (includes optional CMMI-SVC Supplement)

Dear friends,

As organizations all over North America are starting to look ahead to setting performance improvement goals for 2018, many are considering the advantages of getting CMMI training for their executives and teams.

We'd love for you to join them (and us) for "Intro to CMMI-DEV" with an optional 1-day CMMI-SVC Supplement. See details below. 


Registration is open for the CMMI Institute-authorized “Introduction to CMMI-DEV” class on February 6-8, in Washington, DC, and tickets are in limited supply. The class includes an optional one-day supplement for CMMI-SVC on February 9th. Reserve your seat today!

“Introduction to CMMI-DEV” Class (includes optional CMMI-SVC Supplement)

The CMMI is designed to give you proactive control over Project Management, engineering, and process management, and to provide you with an architecture for improving performance.

Federal and State governments use the CMMI as a tool to evaluate contractors and suppliers, and thousands of companies around the globe use this set of best practices as a model for internal performance improvement.

If your company is conducting a CMMI SCAMPI A Appraisal, this is a required course for Appraisal Team Members.

What will you learn in the CMMI training class?


In the class, you’ll learn how to use the CMMI as a guide to help you …

  • Establish a useful level of control over your processes
  • Improve the speed of software delivery, engineered products, and technology services
  • Change and improve the behaviors within your company needed to deliver high-quality services and products

What’s in it for you?

  • Learn about ways to improve performance and remain agile
  • 21 PDUs towards your PMP certification
  • More than a 30% discount
  • Fun and entertaining learning experience with hands-on games, exercises, and lectures

What do you get to take home?

  • CMMI Institute Authorized training materials
  • Broadsword exclusive training materials
  • A copy of CMMI: Guidelines for Process Integration and Product Improvement
  • CMMI v1.3 quick-reference card
  • CMMI v1.3 Reference Poster
  • Certificate of Completion

In “Introduction to CMMI” you will not only learn, but learn to apply what you’ve learned, so that you always know how things are going and how they can be made better.

Will you join us?


Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Subscribe to my CMMI-TV YouTube channel!

Dear Readers,

Happy Halloween!

As you sit at home this evening, waiting for the trick-or-treaters to appear in their costumes at your door, here's a great way to spend the in-between time .... watching CMMI-TV on your phone!



Subscribe to my mobile-friendly CMMI-TV channel on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/asktheCMMIAppraiser

Enjoy the show, and have fun passing out the Halloween goodies!

ABOUT CMMI-TV: CMMI-TV is a place where we can add value to the engineering and software development community by offering advice on engineering strategy, performance innovation and software process improvement. If you find this useful, please forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

CMMI SCAMPI: where do we start?

Hey, CMMI Appraiser, 

One of our government customers has been urging us for years to adopt CMMI and do a SCAMPI A Appraisal.  Well, I’m not proud to say we have been putting it off. But now two other customers are saying we have to do this if we want to keep their business. OK, so, we’re ready! Where do we start? ~ Ryan S.


Ryan, one place to start would be to thank your customers for pushing you to be a great company. It sounds like they are trying to get you to do the things you’ve known you should do anyway. I suppose it's human nature to put up resistance at first. I notice the same dynamic with my personal fitness trainer – except your customer is paying you!



The personal trainer is a pretty good analogy. In many ways, the journey to adopting the CMMI is similar to the journey to becoming physically fit. Companies that choose to work with Broadsword go through a detailed progression on their way to CMMI Maturity Level 3, for instance, and put themselves on the path to becoming a great company.

There's an old adage that a journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step. To keep you moving in the right direction, here are the first five steps:

Step 1: Class C Appraisal (Gap Analysis) is first and foremost a way for your company to find out about itself and how your performance aligns with the CMMI model. It’s also an opportunity for your CMMI Appraiser to learn as much about your company as they can, and for your company to learn about the CMMI Appraiser. This is important because you will be spending a lot of time together, generally a year or two, making decisions that will have an serious impact on the behaviors of your people. And so, helping both sides feel more comfortable with each other is one of the most beneficial aspects of the SCAMPI C.

Step 2: Training – There are a number of training courses that need to take place on your journey to CMMI ML3. First is the Introduction to CMMIhttps://broadswordsolutions.com/products-and-services/training/ training course, followed by training on how to become expert process engineers. We teach you how to execute our AgileCMMI methodology, and how to design and develop processes. Your entire appraisal team goes through the training, plus anyone who plays a key leadership role in the company in terms of how they want the work performed, such as project managers, program leaders and line managers.

Step 3: Tune-up – After the Class C, and often concurrently with the training, we will provide you with a plan that identifies all the tuning up or development of processes that must occur in your company. The plan includes everything you need to do in the context of AgileCMMI, the Special Interest Groups (SIGs) to be created, as well as all of the releases and iterations that must take place between now and your SCAMPI B Appraisal.

Step 4: SCAMPI B – After you’ve done the training and the tune up, you are ready for the SCAMPI B Appraisal. The SCAMPI B is an formal appraisal that serves as a tool to give you the information you need to completely understand your current state in relation to the CMMI. It gives you the information you need to determine whether you will succeed in the formal SCAMPI A, as planned.

Step 5: SCAMPI A –After you’ve satisfactorily completed your SCAMPI B, you are ready for a formal SCAMPI A appraisal, and you’ll want do all you can to assure a positive result. If your SCAMPI A is successful, congratulations!

But don’t make the mistake of thinking you've arrived, and can just drop everything you’ve learned. To return to the fitness metaphor, once I’ve achieved my target weight, I don’t want to celebrate by eating a gooey chunk of chocolate cake. Getting in shape and becoming a CMMI Maturity Level 3 doesn’t make you a great company. It just means you are sufficiently equipped with the infrastructure and tools you need to become a great company. Whether or not you make the changes in your company – and make the commitment to long-term health as an organization – is up to you.

If you would like gain a deeper understanding of CMMI, we’ve just announced the dates for our next "Intro to CMMI-DEV" class (February 6-8, 2018), which includes an optional 1-day CMMI-SVC supplement. for CMMI-DEV (February 9, 2018). Join us in the Washington, DC area for a practical, fun, fast-paced and interactive classroom experience! Sign up here.

Like this blog? Forward to your nearest engineering or software exec!

Jeff Dalton is a Certified SCAMPI Lead Appraiser, Certified CMMI Instructor, author and consultant with years of real-world experience with the CMMI in all types of organizations. Jeff has taught thousands of students in CMMI training classes and has received an aggregate satisfaction score of 4.97 out of 5 from his students.

Visit www.broadswordsolutions.com for more information about engineering strategy, performance innovation, software process improvement and running a successful CMMI program.